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Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

5 edition of The G protein-coupled receptors handbook found in the catalog.

The G protein-coupled receptors handbook

The G protein-coupled receptors handbook

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  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Humana Press in Totowa, N.J .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • G proteins -- Receptors -- Handbooks, manuals, etc

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Lakshmi A. Devi ; foreword by Andreas Engel, Krzysztof Palczewski.
    GenreHandbooks, manuals, etc.
    SeriesContemporary clinical neuroscience
    ContributionsDevi, Lakshmi A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP552.G16 .G174 2005
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 412 p. :
    Number of Pages412
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17921305M
    ISBN 101588293653
    LC Control Number2004024043

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), also called seven-transmembrane receptor or heptahelical receptor, protein located in the cell membrane that binds extracellular substances and transmits signals from these substances to an intracellular molecule called a G protein (guanine nucleotide-binding protein). GPCRs are found in the cell membranes of a wide range of organisms, including mammals.   Introduction. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest protein superfamily in mammalian genomes. They share a common seven-transmembrane topology and mediate cellular response to a variety of extracellular signals ranging from photons and small molecules to peptides and proteins ().Diversity of the extracellular ligands is reflected in the structural diversity of Cited by:

    Purchase Pharmacology of G Protein Coupled Receptors, Volume 62 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN , The first part of the book is mainly concerned with G protein-coupled receptors and covers structural studies of conformational changes and binding sites, phosphorylation and desensitisation.

    G Protein Coupled Receptor. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cellular surface receptors that are crucial for the control of a diverse array of developmental and physiological processes, disruptions of which cause diseases (O'Hayre et . Handbook of Cell Signaling. Book • 2nd Edition • G-protein-coupled receptors have evolved a variety of mechanisms to acquire information about the environment of a cell. This chapter describes a subfamily of heptahelical receptors known as protease-activated receptors (PARs), which have evolved to sense proteases.


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The G protein-coupled receptors handbook Download PDF EPUB FB2

In The G Protein-Coupled Receptors Handbook, leading academic researchers comprehensively survey the many recent advances that have occurred in the GPCR field.

The authors describe the current knowledge of GPCR receptor structure and function, the different mechanisms involved in the regulation of GPCR function, and the role of pharmacological chaperones in GPCR folding and 5/5(1).

In The G Protein-Coupled Receptors Handbook, leading academic researchers comprehensively survey the many recent advances that have occurred in the GPCR field. The authors describe the current knowledge of GPCR receptor structure and function, the different mechanisms involved in the regulation of GPCR function, and the role of pharmacological chaperones in GPCR folding and.

Introduction. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in many processes in the human body relevant to health and disease, and consequently are the targets of approximately 70% of pharmacological therapeutics and a major source of new drug candidates.

In The G Protein-Coupled Receptors Handbook, leading academic researchers comprehensively survey the many recent advances that have occurred in the GPCR field.

1st Edition Published on Octo by CRC Press The cloning, sequencing, and expression of a variety of membrane receptors and channels indicate the exis Handbook of Receptors and Channels: G Protein-Coupled Receptors - 1st. G Protein-coupled Receptors - Molecular Pharmacology provides a clear summary of the current knowledge in this fast-evolving field.

The book sets out with an introduction tosignalling molecules and their receptors, and an overview of the technical approaches used to investigate these by:   G Protein-coupled Receptors: Molecular Pharmacology provides a clear summary of the current knowledge in this fast-evolving field.

The book sets out with an introduction to signalling molecules and their receptors, and an overview of the technical. About this book G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are not only the largest protein family in the human genome but are also the single biggest target for therapeutic agents.

Research into GPCRs is therefore growing at a fast pace and the range of techniques that can be applied to GPCRs is vast and continues to grow.

G Protein-Coupled Receptors - CRC Press Book Covering recently developed methods in membrane-bound receptors, this book emphasizes receptor structure and function, knowledge of which is essential to the study of signal transduction.G Protein-Coupled Receptors has culled contributors from domestic and international sources, providing a broad.

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and diverse family of proteins whose primary function is to transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular signals.

They are among the largest and most diverse protein families in mammalian genomes. On Cited by:   Covering recently developed methods in membrane-bound receptors, this book emphasizes receptor structure and function, knowledge of which is essential to the study of signal transduction.G Protein-Coupled Receptors has culled contributors from domestic and international sources, providing a broad base of knowledge.

Some topics covered are the r. Book Description. Covering recently developed methods in membrane-bound receptors, this book emphasizes receptor structure and function, knowledge of which is essential to the study of signal transduction. G Protein-Coupled Receptors has culled contributors from domestic and international sources, providing a broad base of knowledge.

This book assists with the study of structural, molecular, cell biological, and in vivo facets of GPCRs, and the development of tools for screening novel GPCR drugs, with sections on tweaking of ligands, bioluminescence and FRET, GPCR signaling properties, and subcellular compartmentalization.

Using disease-oriented methods to cover everything from screening to expression and crystallization, G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Discovery describes the physiological roles of GPCRs and their involvement in various human : Hardcover.

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) all have a similar structure with _____ transmembrane domains. When a GPCR binds an extracellular signal, an intracellular G protein, composed of _____ subunits, becomes activated. _____ of the G-protein subunits are tethered to.

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are heptahelical transmembrane receptors that convert extra-cellular stimuli into intra-cellular signaling, and ultimately into biological responses.

Since GPCRs are natural targets for approximately 40% of all modern medicines, it is not surprising that they have been the subject of intense research.

The Handbook of Receptors and Channels is the first handbook series to present the enormous amount of new molecular biological receptor data in a practical and useful format. G Protein-Coupled Receptors is the first volume in this new handbook series.

Topics covered in future volumes include:Brand: CRC Press. "The G Protein-Coupled Receptors Handbook offers pharmacologists, biochemists, and neuroscientists an exhaustive review of the progress made in understanding how GPCRs are activated and regulated, key factors in exploiting GPCRs for drug development."--Jacket.

Many different mammalian cell-surface receptors are coupled to a trimeric signal-transducing G protein. As noted earlier, ligand binding to these receptors activates their associated G protein, which then activates an effector enzyme to generate an intracellular second messenger (see Figure a).

All G protein – coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain seven membrane-spanning regions with their N Cited by: 2. G-protein coupled receptors are cell surface receptors that pass on the signals that they receive with the help of guanine nucleotide binding proteins (a.k.a.

G-proteins). Before thinking any further about the signaling pathways downstream of GPCRs, it is necessary to know a few important facts about these receptors and the G-proteins that. Restricted GPCR mobility and G protein coupling.

Spontaneous receptor–G protein coupling. Interaction of two G proteins with one activated receptor state. Multiple receptor conformations.

Multistate receptors and multiple ligand binding sites ‘Competitive’. Hans Rosenfeldt, J. Silvio Gutkind, in Handbook of Cell Signaling, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of cell surface receptors and govern a multiplicity of intracellular signaling mechanisms, fulfilling a wide range of critical physiological and cell-specific actions.

This vast signaling potential of GPCRs, however, leaves cell-specific transduction pathways vulnerable to .G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of cell-surface receptors, with more than members identified thus far in the human genome.

They regulate the function of most cells in the body, and represent approximately 3% of the genes in the human : $1st Edition Published on Septem by CRC Press The broad range of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) encompasses all areas of modern medicine and hav G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Discovery - 1st Edition - Kenneth.